Why Monitor Biodiversity?

Why Monitor Biodiversity?

PLANT SPECIES

MAMMAL SPECIES

BIRD SPECIES

REPTILE SPECIES

AMPHIBIAN SPECIES

FISH SPECIES

An article published in 2014 in the magazine Science gives a sense of how anthropic action is affecting biodiversity all over the world: the current extinction rate of species on earth, provoked by mankind, is a one thousand times higher than the natural rate.

Amphibians, for example, are suffering from a disease whose cause is unknown and which has wiped out 170 species of frogs and toads in the last 30 years. But thanks to monitoring efforts, scientists were able to identify the species most at risk and which regions are more vulnerable.

The Amazon is home to 40,000 plant species, 427 mammal species, 1294 bird species, 378 reptile species, 427 amphibian species and around 5000 fish species– and these are just the ones that have been catalogued. Specialists believe that an enormous quantity is still unknown, mainly due to the vast dimensions of the forest and the river basin, as well as the difficulty in accessing research areas far from the roads and large fluvial canals.

Accompanying the fauna and constructing consolidated, shared inventories of biodiversity is, thus, fundamental for adopting effective processes for handling and conservation. Projects like Providence are ultimately light to be shed on the Amazon Rainforest, which remains largely unknown and in need of effective guidelines for environmental protection policies and goals.

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